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braasch photography

Gary Braasch
Photographer & Journalist
PO Box 1465
Portland, OR 97207 USA
Phone: 503.860.1228

Environmental Photography
Website

warming

Climate change app for IPad and IPhone,
Painting With Time: Climate Change.

UN Calendar Portfolio

Tuvalu, Kirbati, Fiji Photo Reports

pacific oceanWorld View of Global Warming returned to the small island nation of Tuvalu in 2011, six years after photographing there for the book Earth Under Fire: How Global Warming is Changing the World. Both trips were undertaken in February when the yearly tide cycle is at its peak and the highest, called King Tides, rose up onto the coral atolls. Tuvalu, like other very low lying islands such as Kiribati, Marshall Islands, the Maldives -- as well as many continental shores and deltas around the world -- is increasingly under threat of an accelerating rise in sea level.

1. Tuvalu, tiny atoll nation of the Pacific
2. The fate of islands as sea level rises
3. Tuvalu high tide kids, six years later
4. King high tides flood parts of Tuvalu Part 1, Part 2
5. People and stories of Tuvalu
6. A Garden Grows in Tuvalu
7. Kiribati
8. Solar Power for Small Islands
9. A Village in Fiji
10. Measuring Carbon in Hawaii's Forests

During the recent journey, recorded in the photo portfolios and information captions on this and other website pages, Gary Braasch rephotographed some of the people and locations from 2005, and added much more about culture and environmental issues in Tuvalu. He also photographed very high tides in Kiribati, a nation to the north of Tuvalu with much greater population pressure being made worse by tides and water pollution. He spent several weeks on Fiji, where scientists and researchers from the University of South Pacific are studying how village life there is affected by climate and water supply issues.

Enroute home, a stop was made on the Big Island of Hawaii to document how Scripps Institute of Oceangraphy and the U.S. NOAA agency directly measure the increasing amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

Scientific studies dealing with aspects of climate change were documented on this Pacific journey: Research in Tuvalu into how coral atolls shift and change under pressure from rising seas and storms; and in Hawaii, a collaboration among the University of Hawaii, the State of Hawaii, the U.S. Forest Service and Fish and Wildlife Service to measure the amount of carbon stored in and taken up by the forests on the slopes of Mauna Kea.

 

Tuvalu (6 sets)

tuvalu 2011tuvalu 2011tuvalu 2011tuvalu 2011tuvalu 2011tuvalu 2011

Kiribati

Kiribati

Fiji

fiji

 

 

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